Upload speed to Google Drive


#1

Hello, I have installed Duplicati to make some backup to Google Drive. When run backup, notice, upload speed is under 200kb/ and when try to upload the same file over Google Drive web interface the upload speed is 2MB. IS there any way to “speed up” upload speed in Duplicati?
Thank you


Error Unexpected difference in fileset version
#2

How are you measuring speed? I couldn’t find it in my Google Drive web interface. In Duplicati, the best way to see transfer speeds for different types of files (lengths vary, and sometimes this impacts speed) is to set up a –log-file with –log-file-log-level=Profiling, and look through the UploadSpeed lines to see the individual speeds.

Profiling is quite wordy. Setting --log-file-log-level=Retry would be enough to see if you’re slowed by retries. You can also run About --> Show log --> Live if you just want a quick peek, instead of a long history in a logfile.


#3

Hello @ts678 , thank you for your help. Measuring with https://netbalancer.com/


#4

NetBalancer looks like it always reports in bytes not bits, so you probably got 200KB, meaning speed was 10 times slower, not 100 times. Still not great, but one unknown is how NetBalancer computes smoothed speed for cases when it doesn’t actually show a graph of instantaneous speed. The Profiling information (especially if done into a log file, where time is shown to the second) will help find not only retries, but also any excessive gaps between file uploads. Ideally one would have nearly continuous uploading, as files to upload are made and queued in advance based on –asynchronous-upload-limit, if preparation runs faster.

You should be able to look at NetBalancer graphs (or even one in Task Manager) to see a bit of burstiness. Looking at the temporary files (names begin with dup, and times will be current) will hint at upload queues. Looking in Task Manager at other performance metrics such as CPU and Disk might show speed limiters. Backups need a lot more than just a file transfer. There’s scanning, compression, encryption, and more…